That’s a wrap! See you in Denver in 2022!

And that’s a wrap for Open Repositories 2021! It has been an excellent four days of workshops, keynotes, presentations, panels, posters, and conversations. A big, big thank you to:

        • All of our attendees. Open Repositories is first and foremost about the community, and you all came through with great questions and comments.
        • Our 200 some presenters. The content you presented was thought provoking, useful, and engaging. We especially want to thank those of you who presented in English when it is not your native language.
        • Our keynote speakers, Jeremy Farrar, Stephanie Russo Carroll, and Bianca Amaro for such challenging and inspiring keynotes. Keynote speakers so often set the tone for a conference, and these speakers were no exception.
        • Our sponsors. Even with a virtual conference, there are expenses and we really appreciate the support of our sponsors – many of whom have been long time supporters of Open Repositories.
        • Organizations providing technical and logistical support in terms of Zoom access, website support, and fiscal support. We want to recognize EIFL, WACREN, CLIR, the Digital Repository of Ireland, and the University of Arizona Libraries for their support.
        • Our reviewers who helped guide what was accepted into the program and what wasn’t. We appreciate the time and energy you put into reviewing proposals!
        • Our program chairs and program committee who put in an incredible amount of work on managing the program from the call for proposals to managing the review process to putting together a compelling program.
        • Our host committee  who managed logistics for registration and scheduling, zoom set up, live streaming, sponsorship, social media, and so much more.

Nearly all of the presentations, keynotes, and workshops are now available in our YouTube channel and also deposited into the Open Repositories Zenodo community.

Finally, we are very excited to be planning to have our 2022 conference in person in Denver, Colorado, USA. The conference will be hosted by the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries. See you all in 2022!

Welcome to day 3! OR goes global

Welcome to Open Repositories 2021 day 3! Today’s schedule is available to registered attendees in Sched and publicly in Conftool. Note that all times are in UTC! Today, OR goes truly global with sessions spanning 16 hours and many timezones. Can’t stay up all night, even for OR? Look for recordings in  Zenodo soon!

Session links & livestream

As a reminder, all session links are available to registered attendees Sched . Registration is now closed, but sessions are livestreamed via Youtube.

Program Highlights

Today there are many highlights! They include: the first Developer Track session (9:00 UTC), Posters Minute Madness (12:00 UTC), the evergreen Repository Rodeo (13:00 UTC) , and a keynote from Dr. Tahu Kukuta and Dr. Stephanie Russo Carroll (22:00 UTC) on Indigenous data.

See today’s full schedule in Sched and Conftool

Networking event

Missing the camaraderie of the conference experience? While there’s no conference dinner on a boat this year, we have the next best thing – a video networking session via Wonder at 17:00 UTC. This is open to registered attendees only.

Wonder allows you to roam around a virtual room and join/leave conversations much like at a live event. For more on how it works, see the Networking section of the attendee guide.

OR2021 sponsors – 4Science, Atmire, Cayuse, The Library Code, MyScienceWork and Samvera – will be in their dedicated Wonder room areas and we encourage you to have a chat with them. You can also chat with others about the Ideas challenge, catch up with old friends, or make new acquaintances! 

Check out more about OR sponsors on Youtube!

Welcome to day 2! Session links, livestream & recordings

Welcome to day 2 of Open Repositories 2021, where we’ll kick off the main programme! Below is important information about accessing conference sessions, livestreams and recordings.

Session links

  • Registered attendees must log into Sched to access session links! 
  • If you did not register, see livestream/recording info below (registration is now closed, as we have reached our maximum capacity)
  • Registered attendees were sent an invitation to join Sched. Check your inbox (or spam) for an email from notifications@sched.com with subject “You’re Invited To Open Repositories 2021”.
  • If you’re having trouble logging into Sched, you can set or reset your password . Use the email address that you used when registering for the conference in Eventbrite.

Livestream & recordings

  • Sessions will be livestreamed on YouTube. If you didn’t register for the conference or a session is full when you try to join, check out the livestream!
  • The public schedule is at https://www.conftool.net/or2021/sessions.php, so you can see which sessions you might be interested in watching via Youtube or recordings.
  • If you can’t make it to a session, recordings will be available on Youtube shortly after each session.
  • Recordings and slides from yesterday’s workshops are available now.

For more details, see the attendee guide. If you’re presenting, also see the presenter guide.

Is it interoperability or is it integration?

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Paul L.S. Stokes; Tamsin Burland; John Kaye; Howard Williams

Poster description:

For those not of a technical bent, there is a great deal of confusion surrounding the terms ‘interoperability’ and ‘integration’, especially when it comes to the exchange of information in ‘black-box’ systems. The average depositor of data doesn’t want (or need) to know how data and meta data move around a system as long as what they put in eventually gets to where it should be, in the form it should be and can be seen by the appropriate people. However, a basic understanding of the similarities and differences between ‘interoperable’ systems and ‘integrated’ systems and the pros and cons of each approach when it comes to depositing, preserving and discovering data will help users and administrators make informed decisions when it comes to the specification of data management systems, and will help inform their day-to-day data management practices. This poster is intended to highlight those similarities and differences, pros and cons.

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About the authors:

Paul Stokes has had a varied career in both the commercial sector and academia (and all points in-between). At present he leads on preservation for Jisc’s Preservation service (and is currently referred to as a “Product Manager”). He is a director of the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) and a director of the Open Preservation Foundation (OPF). He’s been passionate about repositories and preservation for many decades and currently also has a number of bees in his bonnet regarding costs, value, sustainability, and storage.

 

Sherpa Romeo: Our roadmap

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Karen Jackson and Jane Anders

Poster description:

This poster will present the Jisc Open Research team’s roadmap for the development and enhancement of Sherpa Romeo over the coming years, and invite feedback, comments and questions from the user community.  We will be looking at the ways we plan to enhance the service, infrastructure and usability of Romeo, to ensure we are continuing to meet the needs of all our users throughout the changing OA policy landscape.

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About the authors:

Karen Jackson (Presenting author) is a Product Manager, Open Research Services team, at Jisc. She is responsible for the management and development of the Sherpa Services products. Karen is a library & information professional with a background in Higher Education libraries, repository management, open access and service/product management.  She has recently joined the Sherpa team having previously worked on other services supporting Open Access since joining Jisc in 2017.

Jane Anders is a Service Owner, Open Research Services team, at Jisc, responsible for the day-to-day running of the Sherpa Services. Jane is an information professional with a background in information management and science information provision, also a Chartered member of CILIP and an Associate member of ILM.  Her experience includes delivering expertise in open access, data collection and analysis of information and data.

Advancing Hyku project: Year two project update

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Ellen Ramsey, Brian Hole and Ilkay Holt

Poster description:

Join a Year Two project update for the Advancing Hyku collaborative project, which aims to support the growth of green open access through institutional repositories. The deliverables of the project are to introduce significant structural improvements and new features to the Samvera Community’s Hyku platform. The project partners are University of Virginia Library, Ubiquity Press and the British Library, with funding from Arcadia, a charitable fund of philanthropists Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. The project began October 2019 and is scheduled to conclude with a rollout of the Advanced Hyku platform community-wide after February 2022. https://advancinghyku.io/

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About the authors:

Ellen Catz Ramsey (Presenting author) is Acting Director for Scholarly Communications at the University of Virginia Library in Charlottesville, VA, and Principle Investigator for the Advancing Hyku Project funded by Arcadia. She received her MLIS from Florida State University and her M.Ed. from the University of Virginia, and works to make scholarly content generated by and for the academic community openly accessible.

Brian Hole is the CEO of Ubiquity Press. He founded Ubiquity Press out of frustration with the options provided by legacy publishers and platforms for open access and open science. The Ubiquity platform is a SaaS offering for university presses and libraries that offers repositories as well as full support for open access publishing. A customer charter and community governance guarantee that all products will remain open source and open access. Prior to Ubiquity Brian held positions at Business Objects, Elsevier and the British Library. He holds a PhD in archaeology from University College London.

Ilkay Holt is Repositories and Community Engagement Lead at the British Library and is one of the project managers for Advancing Hyku. She has been working in the field of open repositories in a number of different roles which include the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) and the OpenAIRE project. She has also coordinated training programs at FAO of the UN in farm data management, providing capacity development activities in the context of access to information, open principles, open licensing, and promoting the use of open infrastructure.

“Precedented”: Public Health, Open Access Infrastructure, and Interrogating Power in Repository Debates

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Kate Dohe and Michael Scott

Poster description:

In January 2020, researchers released the initial DNA sequence for the COVID-19 virus on Twitter, bypassing both traditional publication models and institutional open infrastructure in the interest of expediency. The
global pandemic has drawn open scientific publishing into the spotlight in the mainstream American press over the past year, and citizens outside the Western research community are gaining new exposure to longstanding scholarly communications debates about public health and open science. Unlike many aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, this is not “unprecedented”–freely accessible health information was also the impetus for the open access movement in Latin America years ahead of comparable efforts in the United States, and it continues with great success today. However, discussions of these platforms in USbased publications have centered on questions of prestige and functionality, rather than reach and stability- concepts that are rooted in imperialist, English-first thinking. This poster will highlight the early history of open access repositories in Latin America, their focus on regionally-produced scientific research rather than institutional efforts, the current state of these projects, and apply a critical lens to Western discourse about these projects and their impact.

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About the authors:

Michael Scott (Presenting author) is an Associate Editor/Librarian at the Hispanic American Periodicals Index, UCLA, although he works from home in Pittsburgh. He has worked as a catalog librarian at Vanderbilt and Yale Universities, and in Latin Americanist collection development and reference services at Georgetown University. He has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Latin American and Iberian literatures from the University of Minnesota and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a master’s degree in library and information studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Kate Dohe is the Manager of the Digital Programs & Initiatives department in the University of Maryland Libraries. Kate’s team oversees day-to-day activities related to digital repository management, digital preservation, research data services, and electronic publishing. Select publications include “Care, Code, and Digital Libraries: Embracing Critical Practice in Digital Library Communities” (In the Library with the Lead Pipe), and “Linked Data, Unlinked Communities” (Lady Science).

 

Understanding IR Impact: What Do Users Do With Our Content?

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Wendy Walker

Poster description:

Like many institutions, the University of Montana’s institutional strategy includes a focus on the impact of faculty and student work. It is relatively easy to use quantitative data such as download counts, location information, and citations to help demonstrate the IR’s reach and impact; however, there are limits to using these numbers5, especially when attempting to understand impact outside an academic context. Could knowing more about how or why users use IR content address our own curiosity, help us understand the IR’s impact more completely, and help us contextualize and describe its impact more effectively than we can by reporting quantitative data alone? In April 2018 we added a link to the cover pages that are included with most of the downloadable items in our IR. The link directs users to a form where they can tell us how access to the IR item benefitted them. To date, we have received just over 200 responses. While we now know more about the wide range of uses of our IR content, we are still determining if/how to utilize this information to help demonstrate impact. Our initial evaluation has raised a host of new, useful questions that will inform next steps.

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About the author:

Wendy Walker, Digital Initiatives Librarian at the University of Montana (UM), manages and provides services that help UM faculty, students, and staff share and manage their research and creative scholarship. In addition to managing the institutional repository, she leads OER efforts, offers support for research data management, and oversees digitized collections.

Interoperability and Distributed Collaboration in InvenioRDM

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Sara Gonzales, Matthew Carson, Guillaume Viger, Kristi Holmes, Lars Holm Nielsen

Poster description:

CERN (The European Organization for Nuclear Research) has collaborated for the past 2 years with a widely distributed international community on the development of InvenioRDM, an extensible turn-key repository
solution. Differing metadata standards utilized for description and access across the globe have led to fertile discussions among team regarding the base data model to employ and field-specific controlled vocabularies. As discussions evinced the need to consider increasing stakeholder needs and requirements, it became clear that a dedicated group was needed to support systematic recording and discussion of partner requirements in order to reach decisions on the data model that could have a positive impact on all
adopters. A metadata interest group was formed, with membership open to all project stakeholders, and regular meetings set to discuss user needs, field-by-field. Discussions in this group have helped to reduce the boundaries between distributed stakeholders and bolster the repository community as a whole through a joint, democratic effort open to all, including technical and non-technical participants.

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About the authors:

Sara Gonzales (Presenting Author) is a Data Librarian at the Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. She develops and delivers training in data management and data cleaning to clinical researchers, support staff and students at the Feinberg School of Medicine. She has developed and delivered data-related classes and workshops through the Galter Library DataLab, a data-focused consultation and training core. She chairs the Galter Library’s Digital Initiatives Working Group (DIWG), charged with executing and communicating digital improvements implemented across the library and related university systems. In addition she serves as the Community Manager of the international InvenioRDM repository software development project and Assistant Director of the National Evaluation Center of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Discovery after migration: How to achieve up to 285% more downloads

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Taylor Mudd

Poster description:

Institutions are often apprehensive when moving their repository to a new repository system, as this will affect hundreds of thousands of records collected over decades and the discoverability of their institution’s
research. This poster will present statistics on item usage and discovery after repository migration, using data from an external independent repository monitoring service to show an increase in usage of up to 250% and explain how this can be achieved.

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About the author:

Taylor Mudd is the lead developer for the Haplo Repository – an open source repository solution provided by Haplo, a division of Cayuse. After graduating from the University of Southampton in 2019 he joined Haplo Services (now Haplo, a division of Cayuse) and is now responsible for all core development for their repository solution.

Interoperability intersection: Partnerships in Open Science infrastructure

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Eric Olson

Poster description:

Enabling interoperability throughout the research lifecycle often aligns with or is a key component of the missions of open source tool providers. Even before the introduction of the FAIR framework, open source tools and infrastructure have emphasized opportunities to connect the systems and
workflows that researchers rely on so that research communication can be faster, more efficient, and more secure. OSF, like many of our friends in the open science infrastructure space, is strengthened both as a technical tool and as a ‘community of communities’ by integrations with other platforms and services. In this poster we will describe our product philosophy that emphasizes interoperability and meeting researchers where they are, while also discussing our experiences with partnership building across outstanding organizations and providers in research. We will also visualize current and upcoming integrations that strengthen both OSF and partner tools while also making it much easier for researchers to manage and collaborate across the research data, planning, and outcomes.

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About the author:

Eric Olson has spent more than six years guiding research infrastructure community building, policy, development, and adoption. He spent two years at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, which develops Zotero, Omeka, and more, as well as three years at ORCID before joining COS to lead OSF product and sustainability initiatives.  Eric has advanced degrees in science communication and has experience in communication, media effects, and historical research.

SANDIMS: South African National Geophysical Data and Instrumentation Management System

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Kate Niemantinga and Pierre Cilliers

Poster description:

The archiving and dissemination of geophysical research data collected over Southern Africa, Antarctic research base (SANAE IV) and at the South African high latitude observatories on Marion Island and Gough Island, has until recently been fragmented and inaccessible to international researchers. At the Space Science Directorate of the South African National Space Agency (SANSA) in Hermanus we have implemented a scientific data portal called the South African National Geophysical Data and Instrumentation Management System (SANDIMS) which for the first time makes the geophysical data collected and used by SANSA available through a single data portal. Our aim is that the system will meet national and international obligations and expectations, as well as raise the standard of South African research. The system’s unique database will contain high-quality data from areas in space that, potentially, could supply information for unanswered scientific questions and enhance scientific development.  The paper will share insights from various topics including Data Policies, Licensing, Data Discovery and showcase tools for researchers and practitioners.

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About the authors:

Kate Niemantinga (Presenting author), the Data Acquisition Practitioner at the Space Science Directorate of the South African National Space Agency since 2015 is responsible for the data produced by the South African remote sensing instrumentation network. A senior SQL developer and data analyst with two decades of experience.

Dr. Pierre Cilliers is a retired Professor of Electronic Engineering, employed on a part-time contract at SANSA since 1 April 2018. Since 2004 he was employed as a research physicist at the Space Science Directorate of the South African National Space Agency, previously known as the Hermanus Magnetic Observatory (HMO).  During 2016 he was the Project Coordinator for the development of the SANDIMS data portal. At the time of his retirement from SANSA at the end of 2017, he was the group leader for research on Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GICs) at SANSA Space Science, and the PI for a collaborative research project with Italy on monitoring space weather impacts on the ionosphere in Antarctica by means of ionospheric scintillation receivers. He has supervised several postgraduate students at SANSA and has produced more than 30 peer-reviewed publications since joining the HMO in 2002.

 

 

 

 

Changes and impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic response on Arca

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Martins da Costa Ferreira, Tiago; Fernandes de Queiroz, Claudete; Danielli de Araujo, Luciana; Belchior Rodrigues, Raphael; de Almeida Freyre, Éder; Gonçalves do Nascimento, Andréa; José Moreira Silva, Angelo; Barreto Malheiro Pereira, Catarina; da Silva, Rita de Cassia; Simonini Ferreira, Leonardo

Poster description:

This work presents the changes and impacts on Arca1 – Oswaldo Cruz Foundation’s2 (Fiocruz) Institutional Repository, of the COVID-19 response, which has been terrorizing the world. Due to the recognition from the World Health Organization, the importance of the scientific research of the Institution and the technological progress related to vaccines development, supplies and innovative treatments have become crucial. In this epidemiological scenario, including scientific documents and research material of this Institution related to COVID-19 on Arca was deemed critical and of large relevance. It is important to note that the changes, adaptations and focused efforts for the pandemic response, especially with the reduced issuing time, are intended to increase visibility, promote health with public goods and provide access to the knowledge produced by Fiocruz to the whole society.

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About the authors:

 

 

Geodisy: New geospatial data discovery for Canadian research data

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Eugene Barsky; Mark Goodwin and Paul Dante

Poster description:

With the rapid proliferation of research data, it is vital to create innovative tools for data discovery and access. This is the goal of Portage’s Geodisy project, an open-source spatial discovery tool for Canadian interdisciplinary open research data. Geodisy provides a map-based search available alongside the Federated Research Data Repository (FRDR), a
national discovery layer indexing over 70 Canadian open repositories. Geodisy is intended for users with diverse experience levels and subject interests and is designed to be accessible for those without GIS knowledge. Data and metadata are extracted from the native repositories and are discoverable based on their location, and individual geospatial files are previewed as visual overlays. For any research that relates to geospatial location, this tool provides a new and useful form of visual discovery

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About the authors:

Eugene Barsky is the Head of Research Commons at UBC. Eugene is the past Chair of the national Portage Data Discovery Expert Group, participates in building the Canadian Federated Research Data Repository service (FRDR), and collaborates with Research Data Canada (RDC) and the European Union (OpenAIRE). Eugene is the lead Principal Investigator for the national Geodisy project, previously funded by CANARIE, and now integrated with FRDR and funded by NDRIO. His recent peer recognition included the American Society for Engineering Education and Special Library Association awards. He published more than 25 peer-reviewed papers and presented at more than 70 conferences. Eugene is an adjunct professor at the iSchool at UBC, teaching the course in research data management, and is one of the founders of the Pacific Northwest data curators group.
Mark Goodwin. As the Metadata Coordinator for the Geodisy project, Mark works alongside Portage’s Federated Research Data Repository (FRDR) team to provide expertise for the creation, management, and presentation of metadata for geospatial discovery. He is the Co-Chair of Portage’s Dataverse North Metadata Working Group, which establishes metadata best practices for Canadian researchers using Dataverse. Mark is passionate about improving access to information and is excited to help enhance the discoverability of research data in Canada.
Paul Dante actively creates an open-source data pipeline to help researchers find and access geospatial and quasi-geospatial data. Tying together existing components with a custom-written Java middleware that cleans and enhances existing metadata, this project will help make Canadian research data more easily accessible.

The Scholarship of the Ohio State University: Open for all

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Maureen Walsh

Poster description:

The Ohio State University Libraries promotes innovative research and creative expression and curates and preserves information essential for scholarship and learning. Making the research and scholarship of Ohio
State’s faculty, staff, and students openly available allows us to live our land grant mission – sharing knowledge and culture with the people of Ohio, the nation, and the world. This poster will discuss current developments with The Ohio State University Libraries’ “Transforming the Scholarly Publishing Economy” strategic initiative. It will highlight Ohio State’s Open Access agreements, the ongoing development of partnerships across campus and with our consortia and peers, early outcomes of our faculty, scholarly society, and publisher engagements, and thoughts towards future opportunities and challenges.

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About the authors:

Maureen Walsh is an Associate Professor and the Scholarly Sharing Strategist for The Ohio State University Libraries. She heads the Scholarly Sharing Program Area in University Libraries which includes Copyright Services and Publishing and Repository Services. Maureen is the current Vice-Chair of the DSpace Leadership and Steering Groups and the Chair of the DSpace Community Advisory Team. She also represents the Big Ten Academic Alliance on the arXiv Member Advisory Board.

Repository Re(volution): AgEcon search goes global

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Linda Eells and Julie Kelly

Poster description:

The AgEcon Search repository began as a way to leverage the Internet to provide a small-scale solution to a local problem. Launched in 1995 on a “home grown” platform, AgEcon Search has migrated to new
software three times and has grown into an unusually successful disciplinary repository. A small database with 50 papers from the Midwestern United States now hosts 155,000 documents in 15 languages, from 340 organizations in 50 countries on six continents. This growth has occurred with a tiny staff and at an extremely low cost due to an efficient operating model that relies on our member communities to upload
much of their own content. All of the papers in AgEcon Search are associated with an organization such as an academic department, research institute, professional society, or government agency that provides peer
review of some sort, an arrangement that guarantees quality at minimal cost.

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About the authors:

Linda Eells has been a librarian at the University of Minnesota since 2003, providing research and instruction services and co-coordinating the AgEcon Search disciplinary repository. Her research interests include open access publishing models and repository development and management. She holds a MLIS from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a M.S. in Conservation Biology from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.

Julie Kelly (Presenting author) is a science librarian at the University of Minnesota, serving as co-coordinator of AgEcon Search, a disciplinary repository, as well as acting as library liaison for ecology and horticulture.  She holds a MLIS from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and a M.S. in Biology from the University of Minnesota-Duluth. Her research interests include historic data and grey literature.

Atrium Repository: diffusion of cardiology specialized knowledge

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Francijane Oliveira da Conceição; Cyntia Mendes Aguiar; Jorge Juan Zavaleta Gavidia; Cristiane da Cruz Lamas; Renato Cerceau

Poster description:

The Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia (INC), a public tertiary referral cardiology centre located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, aims to structure and organize all available institutional data into one single space that is easily accessible to its workers and also to the wider scientific community and
the general public. At present, these data are dispersed in different sources, with little accessibility and low safety. International experience suggests the most adequate way to preserve the institutional memory and to diffuse knowledge is through a structure called a repository. Technological tools make the creation of a repository easier nowadays. Our Project aims to structure the ATRIUM, INC’s institutional repository. The ATRIUM will store all relevant institutional data and allow members of the public safe and timely access to it.

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About the authors:

Francijane Oliveira da Conceição is a Librarian, with a MSc in Information Science (Fiocruz). She works at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia

Cyntia Mendes Aguiar is a Librarian, with a MSc in Information Science (Fiocruz).  She works at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia.

Jorge Juan Zavaleta Gavidia is a Postdoctoral Researcher fellow in Machine Learning methods to Fake News in heath. He has a PhD in Engineering and Computer Systems (Artificial Intelligence area) from the  PESC/COPPE of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ – Brazil). He also has a Master’s Degree in Computer Science from the Informatics Institute of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS – Brazil). Graduation in Mathematics and Bachelor of Physical Sciences and Mathematics from the National University of Trujillo (UNT-Perú). His research is mainly on Information Systems, Artificial Intelligence, and Data Science with applications in Education, Heath, and Meteorology.

Cristiane da Cruz Lamas is an infectious diseases physician,  currently a member of the Professional Master Course in Cardiovascular Diseases and Head of the Teaching Division in Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia. She also works in Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas, Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, where she is a mentor to medical residents and postgraduate students from overseas. She is a senior lecturer in  Infectious Diseases at  Unigranrio University. Her main interests are infection and teaching.

Renato Cerceau (Presenting author) is a senior researcher, epidemiologist and physician. Currently, he is a member of the Professional Master Course in Cardiovascular Diseases and PostDoc in Telemedicine and Health at Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro. His main interests are data science and health applied computing.

Introduce Impact-Pathways in a CRIS – support societal impact orientation in research projects and funding processes

This poster is part of the Open Repositories 2021 Poster Session which takes place in the week of June 7-10. We encourage you to ask questions and engage in discussion on this poster by using the comments feature. Authors will respond to comments during this week.

Authors:

Birge Wolf; Doris Lange; Thorsten Michaelis; Andrea Moser; Stefanie John; Andreas Abecker; Lucia Hahne; Stefan Lossow; Andrea Bollini; Giuseppe Digilio; Susanna Mornati

Poster description:

Societal challenges require research contributions to solve them. Accordingly, societal impact assessment is an object of increasing interest in publicly funded research. Some countries have build elaborated national systems, applied on the level of research institutions. The approach of the SynSICRIS project (Synergies for Societal Impact in Current Research Information Systems) focuses on societal impact creation and assessment in research projects. Therefore, a repository/CRIS system is being built with additional entities related to societal impact and functionalities to record the information during funding processes. Our system is built upon the open source software DSpace-CRIS. The additional entities include process-oriented indicators that represent an increase in the likelihood of societal
impact. The additional functionalities, allow planning, documenting and structuring contributions of a project to societal impact via interfaces to build impact pathways and working plans. The development built on a synthesis of existing approaches, participatory requirements analysis and agile software development. Using such a system at the funding body enables to assess information related to societal impact without additional documentation burden for researchers, allows to manage sensitive project information and supports the dissemination, reusing and sharing of outputs and information tailored to actors in practice and society.

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About the authors:

Birge Wolf studied agricultural sciences at the University of Kassel with an interdisciplinary focus including social sciences and the design of participatory processes. Since several years, she has been working on the topic of monitoring and evaluating contributions of agricultural research to societal impact. Currently, she is coordinating the SynSICRIS (https://synsicris.de).